The Secret of the Caves

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 Tyree and Erik Contend for Mastery of the Cave
 
Dear Subscriber,

We are nearing the end of posts about The House of Nordquist. The next post will pose some old questions. What is a word? When is a word not a word? And finally, the last of the Nordquist posts will delve into graphic notation—the art of creating images that can be played or sung. After that, stay tuned for some special treats from other writers.
 
Caves. To oversimplify vastly there are two kinds. In one you find darkness and terror, monsters like Homer’s Cyclops. In the other you discover treasures, perhaps of prehistoric art, the dawning aesthetic of our early ancestors.
 
And so it is in The House of Nordquist. In one cave the Faustian Erik seeks the forbidden music that will undo all history and the humans who made it. Out of such destruction, his acolyte Paul believes, he intends to make an entirely new reality. To accomplish his appalling musical alchemy Erik will find the most poisonous essence known to him—the ravages of World War II, extracted from the sounds of the body of a Holocaust victim and distilled in the alembic of pure misanthropy. From this he will compose his atrocious symphony.
 
In the other cave, in a dream of miraculous access, Professor Tyree penetrates the mysteries of the famous caverns of Chavet. In an interior chamber he ponders the startling image of the huge bison with eight legs. “ . . . the ancient artist’s way of indicating the rhythmic running of the beast. I heard the variously pitched drumbeat of the hooves. So here, I thought, is the first octave, long before Pythagoras, resounding in the breasts of the earliest members of our species.”
 
Two caves. Two musics. One the thunder of war and annihilation. The other the interval and beat buried deep in human origins.
 
Please consider sharing the source of these caves with your fellow spelunkers. They only have to click on this image:
  

With every good wish,
Your Reverberant Author
Fiction by Eugene K. Garber
The House of Nordquist
O Amazonas Escuro
Vienna ØØ
The Eroica Trilogy: Selections
Metaphysical Tales
Beasts in Their Wisdom
The Historian

 






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Time Out of Mind

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Professor Tyree Prepares to Meet the Great God Kronos Even as You Prepare to Meet Professor Tyree in The House of Nordquist
 

 
Reminder. There are bonuses for each of the books of The Eroica Trilogy. Click mouse, tap screen, animate the images below. Resubscribe. If you buy a copy of one or more of The Eroica Trilogy books, you are eligible for a free e-copy of the prize-winning collection Metaphysical Tales, about whose author Joyce Carol Oates said “a writer of extraordinary skill and vision.” An estimation, we believe, prophetic.

    

 
In our last post we (an instance, perhaps ill considered, of the “royal first person”) noted the difficulty that Alice, habitué of the House of Nordquist, has in telling her story.

An inconsiderate respondent has offered that Alice did not have any more trouble than the author himself. The author parries.
 
It is unnatural to relate a story in chronological order. One does not remember one’s first romance thus: there was the first coffee together, then a longish phone call, then a dinner etc. No, one immediately remembers the blow-up, recalling unfortunate miscues, words spoken in anger. One remembers the failed reconciliation, the pain, the warning signs unheeded.

In short, one goes straight to the evil blossom, then back to the seed, the toxic irrigation, ahead to the withered flower dewy with tears, a doleful tapestry of misfortune.
 
So, there is an horrific fire at the House of Nordquist. What was going on before the fire? Who was there? What now motivates a strenuous remembering of the fire? Are the memories of the witnesses credible? Where are the witnesses now? What do they want? What are they doing? The fire is the center. Everything radiates from it, not in clock time but the way a blossom unfolds. That is the special pleasure The House of Nordquist  offers, not sequential discovery but a tessellated mosaic. Take up the tiles, dear reader. Fit them together. You are the artist of this mosaic.

The Author
 
Next time: The Secret in the Cave

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Fiction by Eugene K. Garber
The House of Nordquist
O Amazonas Escuro
Vienna ØØ
The Eroica Trilogy: Selections
Metaphysical Tales
 

 














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Friends of Friends

Good Friends All!


The official launch of The House of Nordquist is Saturday, September 8, 2018. Down the ways the strange house/boat goes! But not without your help. Tell your friends. Tell them to tell their friends. Friends don't let friends miss out on the profound edifications of a novel like this.

Don't have any friends? Tell acquaintances, officemates, fellow tenants, annoying neighbors, In these divisive times we must all pull together.

AND, at this very moment the book is on sale for $.99 kindle, just one half of one cent per page.

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The Author

 

Fire and Ice

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The House of Nordquist in a World of Fire and Ice

Dear Reader,
 
This is the third of my posts since you subscribed to these thoughts about The House of Nordquist, the last of the novels of the Eroica Trilogy.
 
Fire and Ice
 
Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.
–Robert Frost
 
As I promised in my last, the subject here is fire and ice. In Frost’s memorable poem the poet speculates about two forms of worldwide destruction, both engineered by human passion—desire (fire), hate (ice). The poem was published a century ago. But how fresh it seems—the climate heating up, fires burning across California; the prospect of nuclear holocaust and nuclear winter, which we thought we had put behind us, now possible again; the universe, composed mostly of anti-matter, dispersing over unimaginable expanses of space-time, disintegrating.
 
Apocalyptic fire and ice are central images in The House of Nordquist. In much religious literature fiery wars mark the End-time—Christian, Hindu, Islamic and others. But I believe that apocalyptic ice is more terrifying than fiery destruction. Intense fire is horrifying, but it is not unfamiliar. There is no absolute temperature. But there is an absolute zero—complete entropy, everything reduced to inert cosmic dust. Universal negation, nullity. No one has ever experienced it. But it is the object of the perverse quest of Gunnar Nordquist, Erik’s mad father, a quest re-enacted for Paul Albright, Erik’s mesmerized acolyte.
 
A question haunts me. That Erik’s aim is apocalyptic is obvious. But what form of End-time does he imagine he will bring about with his demonic musical creation? What can we tell by watching him, by watching the relationships of others with him?

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